biodiverseed:

usda-nrcs:

Carry on the Tradition

In the past, it was customary for people to have a household garden. But with time, this practice faded.

Millie Titla and her 13-year-old nephew, Noah, want to help bring the tradition back to life.  To do so, they are starting with their local Apache community. Their goal is to help people appreciate what gardens can provide for their families.

“Gardening has been a part of the Apache culture for thousands of years, and we’ve lost the traditional way of gardening throughout the century,” said Millie, who works for NRCS as a district conservationist.

With his aunt as his mentor, Noah’s passion gardening with tribal traditions has increased awareness of the benefits and availability of fresh food on the southeastern Arizona reservation.

“I didn’t know that such a small community could grow such a good amount of crops,” Noah said about his 4-H club’s community garden. Club members share the harvested food with their friends and families.

Through hard work, Noah is making a difference in a state where USDA is targeting assistance through the StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity initiative. Read more here.

To get started with NRCS, visit your local USDA Service center or www.nrcs.usda.gov/GetStarted.

#USA #Arizona #indigenous

skunkbear:

huntingtonlibrary:

And now, The Huntington’s tumblr is proud to present…

TIMELAPSE GIFS OF THE BLOOOOOOOOOOOOOOM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The Corpse Flower is named for the terrible stench it gives off to trick beetles and flies (who actually like rotting flesh because that’s where they lay their eggs) into pollinating it. On or around the one night it blooms, it heats up to about 90°F to help the odor chemicals evaporate and spread.

The Corpse Flower’s latin name is Amorphophallus titanum. Can you guess what that means? (Hint: yes, the word phallus is in there.)

Here’s a couple more pretty pictures from The Huntington:

pulitzercenter:

A third of a million Peruvians make their living from gold mining, but illegal tactics and deforestation methods are damaging the environment and inflicting health risks on the local population.
"After years of ignoring the frantic gold rush fouling the Amazon forests of southeastern Peru’s Madre de Dios region, the government has launched a no-mercy campaign to crush it," former Pulitzer Center grantee Nick Miroff reports for the Washington Post.
In 2011, senior producer for the Pulitzer Center Steve Sapienza reported on the dangerous conditions faced by small-scale miners in this region. His work is featured in the Pulitzer Center e-book Tarnished: The True Cost of Gold.

pulitzercenter:

A third of a million Peruvians make their living from gold mining, but illegal tactics and deforestation methods are damaging the environment and inflicting health risks on the local population.

"After years of ignoring the frantic gold rush fouling the Amazon forests of southeastern Peru’s Madre de Dios region, the government has launched a no-mercy campaign to crush it," former Pulitzer Center grantee Nick Miroff reports for the Washington Post.

In 2011, senior producer for the Pulitzer Center Steve Sapienza reported on the dangerous conditions faced by small-scale miners in this region. His work is featured in the Pulitzer Center e-book Tarnished: The True Cost of Gold.

“Don’t sit this one out. Do something. You are by accident of fate alive at an absolutely critical moment in the history of our planet.”

— Carl Sagan (via lifeof-ty)

falkenna:

today’s tomato haul + two tiny strawberries (that were delicious)

amnhnyc:

Spiders are important predators. By one estimate, the spiders on one acre of woodland alone consume more than 80 pounds (36 kg) of insects a year. (Those insect populations would explode without the predators.)

Spiders employ an amazing array of techniques to capture prey.

They play tricks:

Some pirate spiders of the family Mimetidae fool their prey: other spiders. They vibrate the spiders’ webs the same way a struggling insect might. Then, when the host spiders come close, the pirates grab them.

They spit: 

Spiders of the genus Scytodes catch prey by ejecting a glue from their chelicerae (spider mouthparts that end in fangs and inject venom into prey). Once it hits, the gooey substance shrinks, trapping the prey in place.

They use a home field advantage:

Lynx spiders of the family Oxyopidae hunt on plants. They are agile, jumping from stem to stem, and have better vision than many other spiders.

Learn more spider hunting techniques on our blog

Kantaoming is important for our soul, for who we are. I will not let it die.”

Seng Norn, elderly master-musician of the ceremonial funeral music tradition kantaoming. A survivor of the Khmer Rouge regime, Seng Norn is one of the few remaining artists in Cambodia with a deep knowledge of this tradition.

Dr. Catherine Grant on music endangerment, via Oxford Scholarship Online.

(via oupacademic)

theghastlyordealofcorey:

I did it, y’all #imaprofessionalpumpkinfarmer